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Friday, November 17, 2017

Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Friday, November 17, 2017

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #72:
Daze, #72: In the morning, my Dodge van once again performs admirably and starts up, but the day is not getting any warmer than the past two, which were brutally cold, so Vicki and I decide to continue on our road trip. The next stop involves a short stay at the Cliff Lodge in Snowbird, Utah. Although, the resort is a GREAT ski destination, I am not going there for that reason. We are stopping by to install a display of my prints, and participate in a reception. Owners of the Cliff Lodge, saw my work displayed in Sun Valley and on the pages in POWDER magazine, and thought my subject matter would appeal to their high-season winter audience. As Vicki and I get closer to Salt Lake City, the weather warms considerably, and clouds begin to push in from the west. By the time we arrive at Snowbird and the lodge, it is snowing lightly. The lodge, and our room, are spectacular - dramatic accommodations for lounge and dining include huge glass windows that look out at the steep slopes of the resort which are literally surrounding you; ski conditions have been excellent, so the resort is packed and everyone is excited because more snow - fresh powder - is coming; and, the dining is also excellent. The next day it snows on-and-off, and Vicki and I do the exhibit installation. After a great day for the skiers, my reception that night is packed with enthusiastic viewers, and as we close down the bar, post-reception, someone notes that it is REALLY starting to snow outside. When we come down for breakfast in the morning, the place is jammed with many impatient people, and THE WINDOWS HAVE BEEN SHUTTERED! We have had a massive snowfall (10ft+). The resort is closed for avalanche control, and the windows are shuttered because the hotel could be hit. Around 10:30, the all-clear is given, and throngs of eager skiers, rush to the lift lines to be the first to put tracks in deep, untouched powder. Vicki and I plan to drive on to Sun Valley and meet friends, but when we head to the parking lot to dig our car out, Vicki says to me in a panicked voice, “Bobbie, they have towed the van!” We are standing on the high porch of Cliff Lodge looking out over an empty parking lot, and then I realize, it is NOT empty, nothing has been towed - EVERYTHING IS BURIED! We are not going anywhere until they can plow the parking lot. We finally depart around 4pm, arriving late in Sun Valley to dine with our friends. With colleagues in the DFC&FC, we are going to do a ski tour into the Boulder Mountains, north of Sun Valley, that I hope to get published in POWDER magazine. There is also another task I must perform. My alliance with POWDER has brought me sponsors. Some are ski equipment manufacturers, another is the newly founded Pure & Simple organic foods. In this unapologetically terrible promotional shot, stylish DFC&FC member, Gordon Williams, tolerates the lame, “I-am-eating-these-snacks-can-you-see-the-label-clearly?” pose, and some fancy Fischer cross-country skis creep in from the side of the frame. (Those ARE the Boulder Mountains in the background.)
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!




Thursday, November 16, 2017

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #12:
Wind River, #12: The morning is crisp and cool, more like a fall day than a summer one, so we rise early, eat, pack, and are off. We decide to walk the trail on the east shore of the lake which will bring us to the foot of White Rock. From there the trail divides. It rises into the forest toward Clear Lake, and it also continues back down to the valley floor, following the river to further, smaller Green River lakes that lie beneath the distant granite spires. Our walk gives us a much better sense of the granite domain above us, and we also begin to realize how large the lakes and valley are, in which we have camped. Still, we are not IN granite, mostly forest, and it is clear to us now as the day wears on, that we are NOT going to reach any granite on this hike, so Gordon opts for the next best thing - “The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get,” the motto of the DFC&FC advises the day, and he thinks we should summit White Rock to have a better look around.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, November 16, 2017

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #16:
Big Mountain, #16: Just before we arrive at our point of descent into the back bowl that is the heart of The Fantasy Forest, the ridge we are traversing puts on a little light show thanks to a small clearing of the ever-foggier, and cloudier sky. This part of the ridge is also VERY windswept and the snow is crusty. When I comment on it, my guides explain that where we stand is the “generator” for the forest into which we are about to ski. Winds coming across the huge expanse of the Flathead Valley and Flathead Lake pick up moisture from open water. They also draw more moisture from Whitefish Lake, directly at the foot of Big Mountain, then they begin to rise, upslope on the mountain. That turbulent moist air rising rapidly off of the lakes, condenses and becomes a damp, windy fog that rolls over the ridge and down into the freezing conditions of the basin below, crystallizing on anything it touches, especially the trees. It also leaves HUGE prismatic ice-flakes that accumulate like powder, and then sparkle rainbow colors when the sun is out and you ski through them.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.





Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #45:
The Yakutat Forelands, #45: Finally at our pilot’s desired elevation, we turn inland. As we fly directly over the clearcuts on the Yakutat forelands, about to top the coastal front range, we are afforded a view to Cape Yakataga, and sadly, clearcut patches extend the entire length of the the visible coastline. Just for the record, NONE of this wood is used in the USA, but we subsidize the cutting of this timber with our tax dollars. This has been going on for over 50yrs. It has cost US taxpayers over 1-BILLION, and it is a complete boondoggle that should be ended. Don’t allow Alaskan Congressman Don Young, to steal timber from OUR NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS. Ask your representatives to say no to H.R. 232 before 2-MILLION acres of YOUR national forests gets stolen by the highest bidder. In yet another twist in the tales of logging of the Tongass, this logging on the forelands is done by “Native” corporations, but in the “karma-is-a-bitch” vein of things, after the logging, hunting and fishing resources declined which impacted village subsistence living.
photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.


Wednesday, November 15, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #66:
ARCTIC, #66: To this point, it is clear the Canadian mainland is to our east, and offshore land is just a puzzle of unconnected rebound islands beneath us. Then, it seems, the mainland stops and we launch out over a vast expanse of rebound islands, some of them quite large in size. Because there existence is so random, they form many narrow channels and irregularly shaped bays that trap ice blown in by the wind. Notably, we ARE beginning to see more ice, and larger pieces as well. Even with the ice present, I cannot help but feel I am over some Caribbean islands because the sea is such a spectacle of blue colors, and without the boulders, the islands could be beaches. There is a reason you do NOT see anyone swimming here, however. Unfortunately, just as I am getting into my ‘tropical” mood, I hear John muttering something about, “That doesn’t look good!"
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.





Tuesday, November 14, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #64:
THE TONGASS, #64: As we progress in our flight up the fjord toward the LeConte Glacier, the bay becomes increasingly choked with ice. The mountains around us have grown significantly taller, and there are a lot of waterfalls streaming down the walls, flowing out from small glaciers that are suspended in cirques, just about eye-level with us in the plane. After a few twists and turns, the LeConte comes into view, and above it, I can see broken sunlight on the surrounding summits. I ask the pilot if we can fly lower to the face of the glacier, and he responds that we will do that “coming down,” but at the moment, we are GAINING altitude because he is going to fly us up into that sunlight, and take us out over the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness and vast icefield, because he feels we have a very good weather window. Prior to this, I have been in Tracy Arm (posts $18-23 and), so I have seen a fjord and tidewater glaciers, but at this point in my introduction to Alaska, I have not seen the place from which the glaciers come. THAT is about to change quite dramatically!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission:  To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, November 14, 2017 



NO PEBBLE MINE #270, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #270: The broad plane of the frozen river bed I am navigating actually has a few trees large enough to stand well above the snow, and because I am following moose tracks, I approach these clusters carefully as I do not want to be surprised by a moose that believes I am invading its territory. I also stop here for some food, and as I take in my surroundings, I look back at the summit whose base I have just traversed, and I realize how much larger it appears from here, than when I was directly below it. There are some VERY pronounced wind-carved gullies across this face, when the wind is howling through these canyons, it must be fierce. I wonder what the moose do then? Right now, my weather is good. The sky is REALLY clear, so I know tonight will go below zero, but there are still some hours left in the daylight and the cold has not started to settle in, so I press on with my exploration.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd





Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:


FACEBOOK:  http://www.facebook.com/NoPebbleMine.photos

FACEBOOK:  http://www.facebook.com/RobertGlennKetchum

TWITTER:  http://www.twitter.com/RbtGlennKetchum

PINTEREST: http://pinterest.com/littlebearprod/conservation-no-pebble-mine/

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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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