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Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.




Tuesday, August 22, 2017 

NO PEBBLE MINE #258, Pictures from Ground Zero:  
NO PEBBLE MINE #258: I feel relatively warm, except for my fingers which are victims of me having to take most of my gloves off (I have several layers) in order to change film. (Ever load a 645 with cold, brittle film ? - LOL). As we retreat from the peaks and valleys of the backcountry, the weather is increasing, and our visibility is decreasing. As a skier, I have experienced white-outs, a condition where the light is so flat that you cannot see the terrain, so I asks my pilot if that can happen in an airplane. As I feared, his answer is yes, but he assures me that if it looks like that was what was happening, we would just land. When I ask where, he just laughs and says, “pretty much anywhere we want.” Needless to say, I now hope that we will not have to do that. Aside from my apprehensions about the dangers of the weather surrounding us, the strange half-light makes passing walls ghostly dramatic. The pilot and I talk constantly while I shoot, and at this moment (above) I am expressing what an amazing POV I have for the shot, to which he notes I should wait until I take the snowmobile out, and then come here to see what these same walls look like from below. Me on a snowmobile, HERE ! He assures me it is possible.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd


Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:



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Monday, August 21, 2017

Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.




Monday, August 21, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #68:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #68:  Sitting in Pioneer Cabin having dinner after our walk-about in the alpine basins below us that afternoon, two ideas filter into our conversations. One is that I am going to try to get Sun Valley Magazine to run a short article about our campsite clean-up (post #66) as it will serve to promote the photography program I teach at the SVCAC, and it will further the “lore” of the DFC&FC which will help to fill our evening lectures that we give at the Sun Valley Lodge. The other topic of our conversation is the condition of the cabin. The stove barely works and leaks smoke; many of the windows are broken out so it is hard to keep out the cold out and keep in the warmth; the beds are a joke, as springs have rusted away; and because it has rained much of our visit, there are pots EVERYWHERE trying to contain dripping from the porous roof. Inspired by our effort earlier in the day to clean up the filthy sheep camp, I hatch an idea to save the cabin. I will ask Glenn Cooper, whom I work for at the art center, to speak with her friend, Bill Janss, who is developing Sun Valley. As winter approaches, I have noticed many “abandoned” materials lying around as construction sites close down for the season, and I want Sun Valley Company to “donate” nails, glass, scrap board, and rolls of tarpaper to the DFC&FC, so that we may rebuild the cabin. Then, I will do a story about THAT for Sun Valley Magazine. Further, I can see it can become a two-part DFC&FC adventure, if we can start the inside-the-cabin work in the winter, and mix that with a bit of backcountry skiing. Then, we can come back to finish the outside and the roof, the following summer. Glenn Cooper and Bill Janss fully support the idea, and local helicopter pilot, Danny Danielson, offers to donate a couple of flights up to the cabin to carry in the supplies because he likes our initiative as well. The above shot becomes a cover of Sun Valley Magazine.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"








Monday, August 21, 2017

Stoned Immaculate, #42:
Immaculate, #42: In the mid-70’s, the prints I am making are doing well in the market, but I would really like to make them MUCH larger, so I keep hoping I will see some kind of change in technology that will make that happen. In the meantime, I graduate with an MFA from CalArts; I begin working as a curator on the board of the formative Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies: and, I meet a very beautiful Hollywood production assistant named Vicki Golden. Vicki works from project-to-project by choice, which means that she can take time off and travel. It also means that she can choose to work other jobs and still return to doing film crew coordination when good opportunities arise. She and I become partners for most of the next decade, and Vicki travels everywhere that I do, very capably joining in my many adventures. When we ARE back in LA after one of our trips, instead of seeking work in film, she thinks it would be a good idea for both of us if she goes to work for the new G. Ray Hawkins Gallery that has just opened on Melrose Avenue and is ONLY exhibiting photography.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, August 18, 2017

Weekly Post: My Life in the Garden of Eden by Robert Glenn Ketchum

My Life in the Garden of Eden
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As part of paying the bills in my professional career, I photographed a number of significant gardens. I helped create several pretty amazing ones as well. Some of these pictures have been published in various books, but most have never been seen. In this blog, I will show you all my best garden images AND discuss garden design.









Friday, August 18, 2017


My Life in the Garden of Eden, #59:
Garden, #59: To thoroughly rebuff the attack of dune grass in my garden redesign, it is tenacious and I need to get rid of the central root. After cutting off all water (it is summer, so it is not presently raining), and applying an organic, systemic herbicide, the sun has finally fried the grass to its core, so now, I am digging 6”-8” down into the sand dune, extracting the weed root core, AND replacing the dune/sand with AN EVEN DEEPER LAYER OF CHIP. (With REALLY persistent grass/weed problems, you can also put plastic down before the chip, but I do not like to use plastics in my garden.) Doing all of this is where gardening becomes the workout to which I was referring. I do NOT have a team of gardeners and landscape designers doing this for me. As a consequence, and given my elder years, the progress is slow, but steady. Most importantly, it is a daily engagement that, like having pets: greets you every morning; takes a good bit work and exercise everyday; makes you happy by giving you something of beauty to care for and appreciate; rewards you by having contact with living things while contributing to the diversity and well being of the universe; and the exchange of all of this makes both parties healthier. As I have said before, watering your garden is a form of prayer. An exercise that actually gives life.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post: The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Friday, August 18, 2017

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #59:
Daze, #59: There IS a third party traveling with Vicki Golden and I, and her name is Eldorado Belle Starr III, better know to all as “Belle.” This amazing dog is a black Labrador Retriever, that as a 1yr.-old, wins the California bird-dog field championships. My father purchases her as his hunting companion while he spends the fall-winter season at a home in Sun Valley, Idaho, but he realizes when he returns to Los Angeles, that Belle needs more “room-to-roam” and exercise than he has the time for, so he gives her to me, and she LOVES traveling in the van. This dog is word command obedient, and NEVER sees a leash. She also never gets left in the van. She goes everywhere that Vicki and I do, and that includes our adventures. Belle loves swimming, and snow, but most of all, she likes alpine camping, and Vicki and I do quite a bit of that. Some of what we do is pretty extreme, and presses us to backpack all the weight either of us can handle, so Belle carries her own food. The first time I put the saddlebags on her, she sits down at the trailhead and will not get up, so after repeated pleas, Vicki and I begin the hike and walk off, leaving her. About 10-minutes later she comes dragging up the trail behind us and falls into line. The moment of enlightenment occurs for her when we arrive at a beautiful alpine meadow and lake, and we take the pack off. After several moments of hesitation, she breaks into a mad-dash, crazy-dog run around the meadow and then plunges into the lake. In the future, when organizing our backpacks for a trip, she would drag hers in to us to be sure she was going along as well.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Weekly Post: Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, August 17, 2017

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #3:
Big Mountain, #3: Besides a glowing fall, Big Mountain, Whitefish Lake, and the Flathead Valley have water, water EVERYWHERE! Streams, lakes, big rivers, AND it comes out of the sky quite a lot, as well. The work I am doing for realtor/developer, Tom Curran, is going well and the terrain is navigable enough to allow me to drag my 4x5 view camera most places. The few times I actually shoot with my 35mm cameras on Big Mountain property, are when I need longer, telephoto views. I stay for two weeks to watch the end of the fall season and the first snows that signal the beginning of winter. I feel I am having a great shoot with most of what will appeal to Tom accomplished with the big camera. As my visit nears an end, I have one more objective while I am in the valley, and that is to visit Glacier National Park. Glacier is part of the Continental Divide and is also on the border with Canada. There is actually a Canadian “side” to the park that you reach by driving the Going-to-the-Sun Road through the center of the park. I want to do this before it closes for winter, so I can get some sense of the park because, besides returning in the winter to continue my work on the Big Mountain ski area, I am hoping I might discover some opportunities for good stories to contribute to the formative POWDER magazine with whom I have just started working. In the winter, the backside of Big Mountain turns into something called the “Fantasy Forest,” and a ski trip into Glacier might also be possible, so that is what I want scout.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Weekly Post: Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.




Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #32:
The Yakutat Forelands, #32: As the last light fades and the air grows colder, we all realize what a workout the day has been because we are stiff from sitting, AND we still have one more “adventure” before we can return to the cabin - we have to get down the hill to it in the darkening twilight. I would like to thank Carey, for this picture of me taking one last look. As we are putting on our gear for the descent, I would also like to note and thank, Patagonia who supplied me with much of the “new”gear I am sporting. The blue fleece is a 1st generation; the red rain pants, are the 2nd generation of that gear; and the striped, capilene, expedition, zipper-T-neck has just been introduced, and is my FAVORITE piece of equipment. In Alaska, especially, it stays light and warm when wet, it is self-drying, and it easily ventilates to adjust to activity. Just FYI, the beaded belt holds a lens and case, and the yellow bandana is tied to the drawstring of my rainpants, so I can wipe my cameras off easily. Another sign of the times lies just above the bandana on my head. I am sporting a curly-top mohawk. I am shaved shear, on the sides, but it is REALLY long on top and in back. For those who mock we with curly hair, THIS is excellent mosquito/biting fly protection - LOL.
photograph(s) © copyright, Carey D. Peterson, 2017, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post:, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.













Wednesday, August 16, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #53:
ARCTIC, #53: As the pilot is dining with staff in the galley, after the incredible sky-show-sunset, I wander down to have a beer with all of them and ask about the interesting repair on the bubble of his helicopter that seems to be making Bill Simon a bit nervous. The pilot tells me that the damage was done by someone who was careless with a fork-loader, and ran into his parked chopper, putting a big crack in the bubble near the bottom, left-side. This pilot makes most of his money flying assay samples from a mine in Yellowknife, so he does not have the income to casually replace the bubble, but he felt certain he had repaired it using “Iniut skills.” Working with some Native friends, he acquired reindeer sinew - the fiber in muscle meat that Natives use to build sleds and other things - and using a drill to make small holes, created a “sewn” system of lashes and stitches to bind the crack in the bubble closed. It sounded interesting to me, and when I repeat what I have learned to John Bockstoce, he comments that the sinew is stronger than any glue could ever be, and he has no apprehensions about the repair. Bill, however, is still pretty skeptical, so he suggests that since John and I are fine with it, we should be the first to go flying. John and I are good with that, but first Gjoa Haven. The sunset of the night before predicted weather was headed our way, and the color of the morning sky makes it clear that weather has arrived. It looks like our visit to the village is going to be a wet one.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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